Movement data in GIS #31: exploring massive movement datasets

Exploring large movement datasets is hard because visualizations of movement data quickly get cluttered and hard to interpret. Therefore, we need to aggregate the data. Density maps are commonly used since they are readily available and quick to compute but they provide only very limited insight. In contrast, meaningful aggregations that can help discover patterns are computationally expensive and therefore slow to generate.

This post serves as a starting point for a series of new approaches to exploring massive movement data. This series will summarize parts of my PhD research and – for those of you who are interested in more details – there will be links to the relevant papers.

Starting with the raw location records, we use different forms of aggregation to learn more about what information a movement dataset contains:

  1. Summarizing movement using prototypes by aggregating raw location records using our flexible M³ Massive Movement Model [1]
  2. Generating trajectories by connecting consecutive records into continuous tracks and splitting them into meaningful trajectories [2]
  3. Extracting flows by summarizing trajectory-based transitions between prototypes [3]

 

 

Besides clever aggregation approaches, massive movement datasets also require appropriate computing resources. To ensure that we can efficiently explore large datasets, we have implemented the above mentioned aggregation steps in Spark. This enables us to run the computations on general purpose computing clusters that can be scaled according to the dataset size.

In the next post, we’ll look at how to summarize movement using M³ prototypes. So stay tuned!

But if you don’t want to wait, these are the original papers:

[1] Graser. A., Widhalm, P., & Dragaschnig, M. (2020). The M³ massive movement model: a distributed incrementally updatable solution for big movement data exploration. International Journal of Geographical Information Science. doi:10.1080/13658816.2020.1776293.
[2] Graser, A., Dragaschnig, M., Widhalm, P., Koller, H., & Brändle, N. (2020). Exploratory Trajectory Analysis for Massive Historical AIS Datasets. In: 21st IEEE International Conference on Mobile Data Management (MDM) 2020. doi:10.1109/MDM48529.2020.00059
[3] Graser, A., Widhalm, P., & Dragaschnig, M. (2020). Extracting Patterns from Large Movement Datasets. GI_Forum – Journal of Geographic Information Science, 1-2020, 153-163. doi:10.1553/giscience2020_01_s153.


This post is part of a series. Read more about movement data in GIS.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: