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Did you know that MovingPandas also supports local image coordinates? Indeed, it does.

In today’s post, we will explore how we can use this feature to analyze bicycle tracks extracted from video footage published by Michael Szell @mszll:

The bicycle trajectory coordinates are stored in two separate lists: xs_640x360 and ys640x360:

This format is kind of similar to the Kaggle Taxi dataset, we worked with in the previous post. However, to use the solution we implemented there, we need to combine the x and y coordinates into nice (x,y) tuples:

df['coordinates'] = df.apply(
    lambda row: list(zip(row['xs_640x360'], row['ys_640x360'])), axis=1)
df.drop(columns=['xs_640x360', 'ys_640x360'], inplace=True)

Afterwards, we can create the points and compute the proper timestamps from the frame numbers:

def compute_datetime(row):
    # some educated guessing going on here: the paper states that the video covers 2021-06-09 07:00-08:00
    d = datetime(2021,6,9,7,0,0) + (row['frame_in'] + row['running_number']) * timedelta(seconds=2)
    return d
def create_point(xy):
    try: 
        return Point(xy)
    except TypeError:  # when there are nan values in the input data
        return None
new_df = df.head().explode('coordinates')
new_df['geometry'] = new_df['coordinates'].apply(create_point)
new_df['running_number'] = new_df.groupby('id').cumcount()
new_df['datetime'] = new_df.apply(compute_datetime, axis=1)
new_df.drop(columns=['coordinates', 'frame_in', 'running_number'], inplace=True)
new_df

Once the points and timestamps are ready, we can create the MovingPandas TrajectoryCollection. Note how we explicitly state that there is no CRS for this dataset (crs=None):

trajs = mpd.TrajectoryCollection(
    gpd.GeoDataFrame(new_df), 
    traj_id_col='id',  t='datetime', crs=None)

Plotting trajectories with image coordinates

Similarly, to plot these trajectories, we should tell hvplot that it should not fetch any background map tiles (’tiles’:None) and that the coordinates are not geographic (‘geo’:False):

If you want to explore the full source code, you can find my Github fork with the Jupyter notebook at: https://github.com/anitagraser/desirelines/blob/main/mpd.ipynb

The repository also contains a camera image of the intersection, which we can use as a background for our trajectory plots:

bg_img = hv.RGB.load_image('img/intersection2.png', bounds=(0,0,640,360)) 

One important caveat is that speed will be calculated in pixels per second. So when we plot the bicycle speed, the segments closer to the camera will appear faster than the segments in the background:

To fix this issue, we would have to correct for the distortions of the camera lens and perspective. I’m sure that there is specialized software for this task but, for the purpose of this post, I’m going to grab the opportunity to finally test out the VectorBender plugin.

Georeferencing the trajectories using QGIS VectorBender plugin

Let’s load the five test trajectories and the camera image to QGIS. To make sure that they align properly, both are set to the same CRS and I’ve created the following basic world file for the camera image:

1
0
0
-1
0
360

Then we can use the VectorBender tools to georeference the trajectories by linking locations from the camera image to locations on aerial images. You can see the whole process in action here:

After around 15 minutes linking control points, VectorBender comes up with the following georeferenced trajectory result:

Not bad for a quick-and-dirty hack. Some points on the borders of the image could not be georeferenced since I wasn’t always able to identify suitable control points at the camera image borders. So it won’t be perfect but should improve speed estimates.

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Kaggle’s “Taxi Trajectory Data from ECML/PKDD 15: Taxi Trip Time Prediction (II) Competition” is one of the most used mobility / vehicle trajectory datasets in computer science. However, in contrast to other similar datasets, Kaggle’s taxi trajectories are provided in a format that is not readily usable in MovingPandas since the spatiotemporal information is provided as:

  • TIMESTAMP: (integer) Unix Timestamp (in seconds). It identifies the trip’s start;
  • POLYLINE: (String): It contains a list of GPS coordinates (i.e. WGS84 format) mapped as a string. The beginning and the end of the string are identified with brackets (i.e. [ and ], respectively). Each pair of coordinates is also identified by the same brackets as [LONGITUDE, LATITUDE]. This list contains one pair of coordinates for each 15 seconds of trip. The last list item corresponds to the trip’s destination while the first one represents its start;

Therefore, we need to create a DataFrame with one point + timestamp per row before we can use MovingPandas to create Trajectories and analyze them.

But first things first. Let’s download the dataset:

import datetime
import pandas as pd
import geopandas as gpd
import movingpandas as mpd
import opendatasets as od
from os.path import exists
from shapely.geometry import Point

input_file_path = 'taxi-trajectory/train.csv'

def get_porto_taxi_from_kaggle():
    if not exists(input_file_path):
        od.download("https://www.kaggle.com/datasets/crailtap/taxi-trajectory")

get_porto_taxi_from_kaggle()
df = pd.read_csv(input_file_path, nrows=10, usecols=['TRIP_ID', 'TAXI_ID', 'TIMESTAMP', 'MISSING_DATA', 'POLYLINE'])
df.POLYLINE = df.POLYLINE.apply(eval)  # string to list
df

And now for the remodelling:

def unixtime_to_datetime(unix_time):
    return datetime.datetime.fromtimestamp(unix_time)

def compute_datetime(row):
    unix_time = row['TIMESTAMP']
    offset = row['running_number'] * datetime.timedelta(seconds=15)
    return unixtime_to_datetime(unix_time) + offset

def create_point(xy):
    try: 
        return Point(xy)
    except TypeError:  # when there are nan values in the input data
        return None
 
new_df = df.explode('POLYLINE')
new_df['geometry'] = new_df['POLYLINE'].apply(create_point)
new_df['running_number'] = new_df.groupby('TRIP_ID').cumcount()
new_df['datetime'] = new_df.apply(compute_datetime, axis=1)
new_df.drop(columns=['POLYLINE', 'TIMESTAMP', 'running_number'], inplace=True)
new_df

And that’s it. Now we can create the trajectories:

trajs = mpd.TrajectoryCollection(
    gpd.GeoDataFrame(new_df, crs=4326), 
    traj_id_col='TRIP_ID', obj_id_col='TAXI_ID', t='datetime')
trajs.hvplot(title='Kaggle Taxi Trajectory Data', tiles='CartoLight')

That’s it. Now our MovingPandas.TrajectoryCollection is ready for further analysis.

By the way, the plot above illustrates a new feature in the recent MovingPandas 0.16 release which, among other features, introduced plots with arrow markers that show the movement direction. Other new features include a completely new custom distance, speed, and acceleration unit support. This means that, for example, instead of always getting speed in meters per second, you can now specify your desired output units, including km/h, mph, or nm/h (knots).

I’ve previously written about Movement data in GIS and the AI hype and today’s post is a follow-up in which I want to share with you a new review of the state of the art in deep learning from trajectory data.

Our review covers 8 use cases:

  1. Location classification
  2. Arrival time prediction
  3. Traffic flow / activity prediction
  4. Trajectory prediction
  5. Trajectory classification
  6. Next location prediction
  7. Anomaly detection
  8. Synthetic data generation

We particularly looked into the trajectory data preprocessing steps and the specific movement data representation used as input to train the neutral networks:

On a completely subjective note: the price for most surprising approach goes to natural language processing (NLP) Transfomers for traffic volume prediction.

The paper was presented at BMDA2023 and you can watch the full talk recording here:

References

Graser, A., Jalali, A., Lampert, J., Weißenfeld, A., & Janowicz, K. (2023). Deep Learning From Trajectory Data: a Review of Neural Networks and the Trajectory Data Representations to Train Them. Workshop on Big Mobility Data Analysis BMDA2023 in conjunction with EDBT/ICDT 2023.


This post is part of a series. Read more about movement data in GIS.

Today’s post is a geeky deep dive into how to leverage DVC (not just) data version control to track QGIS geoprocessing workflows.

“Why is this great?” you may ask.

DVC tracks data, parameters, and code. If anything changes, we simply rerun the process and DVC will figure out which stages need to be recomputed and which can be skipped by re-using cached results.

This can lead to huge time savings compared to re-running the whole model

You can find the source code used in this post on my repo https://github.com/anitagraser/QGIS-resources/tree/dvc

I’m using DVC with the DVC plugin for VSCode but DVC can be used completely from the command line, if you prefer this appraoch.

Basically, what follows is a proof of concept: converting a QGIS Processing model to a DVC workflow. In the following screenshot, you can see the main stages

  1. The QGIS model in the upper left corner
  2. The Python script exported from the QGIS model builder in the lower left corner
  3. The DVC stages in my dvc.yaml file in the upper right corner (And please ignore the hello world stage. It’s a left over from my first experiment)
  4. The DVC DAG visualizing the sequence of stages. Looks similar to the QGIS model, doesn’t it ;-)

Besides the stage definitions in dvc.yaml, there’s a parameters file:

random-points:
  n: 10
buffer-points:
  size: 0.5

And, of course, the two stages, each as it’s own Python script.

First, random-points.py which reads the random-points.n parameter to create the desired number of points within the polygon defined in qgis3/data/test.geojson:

import dvc.api

from qgis.core import QgsVectorLayer
from processing.core.Processing import Processing
import processing

Processing.initialize()

params = dvc.api.params_show()
pts_n = params['random-points']['n']

input_vector = QgsVectorLayer("qgis3/data/test.geojson")
output_filename = "qgis3/output/random-points.geojson"

alg_params = {
    'INCLUDE_POLYGON_ATTRIBUTES': True,
    'INPUT': input_vector,
    'MAX_TRIES_PER_POINT': 10,
    'MIN_DISTANCE': 0,
    'MIN_DISTANCE_GLOBAL': 0,
    'POINTS_NUMBER': pts_n,
    'SEED': None,
    'OUTPUT': output_filename
}
processing.run('native:randompointsinpolygons', alg_params)

And second, buffer-points.py which reads the buffer-points.size parameter to buffer the previously generated points:

import dvc.api
import geopandas as gpd
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

from qgis.core import QgsVectorLayer
from processing.core.Processing import Processing
import processing

Processing.initialize()

params = dvc.api.params_show()
buffer_size = params['buffer-points']['size']

input_vector = QgsVectorLayer("qgis3/output/random-points.geojson")
output_filename = "qgis3/output/buffered-points.geojson"

alg_params = {
    'DISSOLVE': False,
    'DISTANCE': buffer_size,
    'END_CAP_STYLE': 0,  # Round
    'INPUT': input_vector,
    'JOIN_STYLE': 0,  # Round
    'MITER_LIMIT': 2,
    'SEGMENTS': 5,
    'OUTPUT': output_filename
}
processing.run('native:buffer', alg_params)

gdf = gpd.read_file(output_filename)
gdf.plot()

plt.savefig('qgis3/output/buffered-points.png')

With these things in place, we can use dvc to run the workflow, either from within VSCode or from the command line. Here, you can see the workflow (and how dvc skips stages and fetches results from cache) in action:

If you try it out yourself, let me know what you think.

The QGIS conda packages have been around for a while. One of their use cases, for example, is to allow Linux users to easily install multiple versions of QGIS.

Similarly, we’ve seen posts on using PyQGIS in Jupyter notebooks. However, I find the setup with *.bat files rather tricky.

This post presents a way to set up a conda environment with QGIS that is ready to be used in Jupyter notebooks.

The first steps are to create a new environment and install QGIS. I use mamba for the installation step because it is faster than conda but you can use conda as well:

(base) PS C:\Users\anita> conda create -n qgis python=3.9
(base) PS C:\Users\anita> conda activate qgis
(qgis) PS C:\Users\anita> mamba install -c conda-forge qgis=3.28.2 
(qgis) PS C:\Users\anita> qgis

If we now try to import the qgis module in Python, we get an error:

(qgis) PS C:\Users\anita> python
Python 3.9.15 | packaged by conda-forge | (main, Nov 22 2022, 08:41:22) [MSC v.1929 64 bit (AMD64)] on win32
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> import qgis
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
ModuleNotFoundError: No module named 'qgis'

To fix this error, we need to get the paths from the Python console inside QGIS:

import sys
sys.path
['H:/miniconda3/envs/qgis/Library/./python', 'C:/Users/anita/AppData/Roaming/QGIS/QGIS3\\profiles\\default/python', ... ]

This list of paths can be configured as the defaults for our qgis environment using conda develop:

(qgis) PS C:\Users\anita> conda activate base
(base) PS C:\Users\anita> mamba install conda-build -c conda-forge
(base) PS C:\Users\anita> conda develop -n qgis [list of paths from qgis python console] 

With this setup, the import should now work without errors:

(base) PS C:\Users\anita> conda activate qgis
(qgis) PS C:\Users\anita> python
Python 3.9.15 | packaged by conda-forge | (main, Nov 22 2022, 08:41:22) [MSC v.1929 64 bit (AMD64)] on win32
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> import qgis

The example Jupyter notebook covers running a QGIS Processing algorithm and visualizing the results in the notebook using GeoPandas:

Head over to Github to find the full instructions: https://github.com/anitagraser/QGIS-resources/blob/master/qgis3/notebooks/hello-world.ipynb

December has been busy with two new MovingPandas releases: v0.13 and v0.14.

The latest v0.14 release is now available from conda-forge.

These releases are a huge step forward towards making MovingPandas easier to install with fewer mandatory dependencies. All interactive plotting libraries are now optional. So if you are using MovingPandas for trajectory data processing in the background and don’t need the interactive visualization features, the number of necessary libraries is now much lower. This (and the fact that GeoPandas is now shipped with OSGeo4W) will also make it easier to use MovingPandas in QGIS plugins.

New features:

  • #268 New add_angular_difference method

Includes fixes and enhancements for:

  • #267 Improved documentation: direction values are [0, 360)

Behind the scenes:

As always, all tutorials are available from the movingpandas-examples repository and on MyBinder:

If you have questions about using MovingPandas or just want to discuss new ideas, you’re welcome to join our discussion forum.

In the previous post, we — creatively ;-) — used MobilityDB to visualize stationary IOT sensor measurements.

This post covers the more obvious use case of visualizing trajectories. Thus bringing together the MobilityDB trajectories created in Detecting close encounters using MobilityDB 1.0 and visualization using Temporal Controller.

Like in the previous post, the valueAtTimestamp function does the heavy lifting. This time, we also apply it to the geometry time series column called trip:

SELECT mmsi,
    valueAtTimestamp(trip, '2017-05-07 08:55:40') geom,
    valueAtTimestamp(SOG, '2017-05-07 08:55:40') SOG
FROM "public"."ships"

Using this SQL query, we again set up a — not yet Temporal Controller-controlled — QueryLayer.

To configure Temporal Controller to update the timestamp in our SQL query, we again need to run the Python script from the previous post.

With this done, we are all set up to animate and explore the movement patterns in our dataset:


This post is part of a series. Read more about movement data in GIS.

The latest v0.12 release is now available from conda-forge.

This release contains some really cool new features, including:

  • New function to add an acceleration column #253
  • We have further improved our repo setup by adding an action that automatically creates and publishes packages from releases, heavily inspired by the work of the GeoPandas team.
  • Last but not least, we’ve created a Twitter account for the project. (And might soon add a Mastodon account as well.)

As always, all tutorials are available from the movingpandas-examples repository and on MyBinder:

If you have questions about using MovingPandas or just want to discuss new ideas, you’re welcome to join our discussion forum.

Today’s post presents an experiment in modelling a common scenario in many IOT setups: time series of measurements at stationary sensors. The key idea I want to explore is to use MobilityDB’s temporal data types, in particular the tfloat_inst and tfloat_seq for instances and sequences of temporal float values, respectively.

For info on how to set up MobilityDB, please check my previous post.

Setting up our DB tables

As a toy example, let’s create two IOT devices (in table iot_devices) with three measurements each (in table iot_measurements) and join them to create the tfloat_seq (in table iot_joined):

CREATE TABLE iot_devices (
    id integer,
    geom geometry(Point, 4326)
);

INSERT INTO iot_devices (id, geom) VALUES
(1, ST_SetSRID(ST_MakePoint(1,1), 4326)),
(2, ST_SetSRID(ST_MakePoint(2,3), 4326));

CREATE TABLE iot_measurements (
    device_id integer,
    t timestamp,
    measurement float
);

INSERT INTO iot_measurements (device_id, t, measurement) VALUES
(1, '2022-10-01 12:00:00', 5.0),
(1, '2022-10-01 12:01:00', 6.0),
(1, '2022-10-01 12:02:00', 10.0),
(2, '2022-10-01 12:00:00', 9.0),
(2, '2022-10-01 12:01:00', 6.0),
(2, '2022-10-01 12:02:00', 1.5);

CREATE TABLE iot_joined AS
SELECT 
    dev.id, 
    dev.geom, 
    tfloat_seq(array_agg(
        tfloat_inst(m.measurement, m.t) ORDER BY t
    )) measurements
FROM iot_devices dev 
JOIN iot_measurements m
  ON dev.id = m.device_id
GROUP BY dev.id, dev.geom;

We can load the resulting layer in QGIS but QGIS won’t be happy about the measurements column because it does not recognize its data type:

Query layer with valueAtTimestamp

Instead, what we can do is create a query layer that fetches the measurement value at a specific timestamp:

SELECT id, geom, 
    valueAtTimestamp(measurements, '2022-10-01 12:02:00') 
FROM iot_joined

Which gives us a layer that QGIS is happy with:

Time for TemporalController

Now the tricky question is: how can we wire our query layer to the Temporal Controller so that we can control the timestamp and animate the layer?

I don’t have a GUI solution yet but here’s a way to do it with PyQGIS: whenever the Temporal Controller signal updateTemporalRange is emitted, our update_query_layer function gets the current time frame start time and replaces the datetime in the query layer’s data source with the current time:

l = iface.activeLayer()
tc = iface.mapCanvas().temporalController()

def update_query_layer():
    tct = tc.dateTimeRangeForFrameNumber(tc.currentFrameNumber()).begin().toPyDateTime()
    s = l.source()
    new = re.sub(r"(\d{4})-(\d{2})-(\d{2}) (\d{2}):(\d{2}):(\d{2})", str(tct), s)
    l.setDataSource(new, l.sourceName(), l.dataProvider().name())

tc.updateTemporalRange.connect(update_query_layer)

Future experiments will have to show how this approach performs on lager datasets but it’s exciting to see how MobilityDB’s temporal types may be visualized in QGIS without having to create tables/views that join a geometry to each and every individual measurement.

It’s been a while since we last talked about MobilityDB in 2019 and 2020. Since then, the project has come a long way. It joined OSGeo as a community project and formed a first PSC, including the project founders Mahmoud Sakr and Esteban Zimányi as well as Vicky Vergara (of pgRouting fame) and yours truly.

This post is a quick teaser tutorial from zero to computing closest points of approach (CPAs) between trajectories using MobilityDB.

Setting up MobilityDB with Docker

The easiest way to get started with MobilityDB is to use the ready-made Docker container provided by the project. I’m using Docker and WSL (Windows Subsystem Linux on Windows 10) here. Installing WLS/Docker is out of scope of this post. Please refer to the official documentation for your operating system.

Once Docker is ready, we can pull the official container and fire it up:

docker pull mobilitydb/mobilitydb
docker volume create mobilitydb_data
docker run --name "mobilitydb" -d -p 25432:5432 -v mobilitydb_data:/var/lib/postgresql mobilitydb/mobilitydb
psql -h localhost -p 25432 -d mobilitydb -U docker

Currently, the container provides PostGIS 3.2 and MobilityDB 1.0:

Loading movement data into MobilityDB

Once the container is running, we can already connect to it from QGIS. This is my preferred way to load data into MobilityDB because we can simply drag-and-drop any timestamped point layer into the database:

For this post, I’m using an AIS data sample in the region of Gothenburg, Sweden.

After loading this data into a new table called ais, it is necessary to remove duplicate and convert timestamps:

CREATE TABLE AISInputFiltered AS
SELECT DISTINCT ON("MMSI","Timestamp") *
FROM ais;

ALTER TABLE AISInputFiltered ADD COLUMN t timestamp;
UPDATE AISInputFiltered SET t = "Timestamp"::timestamp;

Afterwards, we can create the MobilityDB trajectories:

CREATE TABLE Ships AS
SELECT "MMSI" mmsi,
tgeompoint_seq(array_agg(tgeompoint_inst(Geom, t) ORDER BY t)) AS Trip,
tfloat_seq(array_agg(tfloat_inst("SOG", t) ORDER BY t) FILTER (WHERE "SOG" IS NOT NULL) ) AS SOG,
tfloat_seq(array_agg(tfloat_inst("COG", t) ORDER BY t) FILTER (WHERE "COG" IS NOT NULL) ) AS COG
FROM AISInputFiltered
GROUP BY "MMSI";

ALTER TABLE Ships ADD COLUMN Traj geometry;
UPDATE Ships SET Traj = trajectory(Trip);

Once this is done, we can load the resulting Ships layer and the trajectories will be loaded as lines:

Computing closest points of approach

To compute the closest point of approach between two moving objects, MobilityDB provides a shortestLine function. To be correct, this function computes the line connecting the nearest approach point between the two tgeompoint_seq. In addition, we can use the time-weighted average function twavg to compute representative average movement speeds and eliminate stationary or very slowly moving objects:

SELECT S1.MMSI mmsi1, S2.MMSI mmsi2, 
       shortestLine(S1.trip, S2.trip) Approach,
       ST_Length(shortestLine(S1.trip, S2.trip)) distance
FROM Ships S1, Ships S2
WHERE S1.MMSI > S2.MMSI AND
twavg(S1.SOG) > 1 AND twavg(S2.SOG) > 1 AND
dwithin(S1.trip, S2.trip, 0.003)

In the QGIS Browser panel, we can right-click the MobilityDB connection to bring up an SQL input using Execute SQL:

The resulting query layer shows where moving objects get close to each other:

To better see what’s going on, we’ll look at individual CPAs:

Having a closer look with the Temporal Controller

Since our filtered AIS layer has proper timestamps, we can animate it using the Temporal Controller. This enables us to replay the movement and see what was going on in a certain time frame.

I let the animation run and stopped it once I spotted a close encounter. Looking at the AIS points and the shortest line, we can see that MobilityDB computed the CPAs along the trajectories:

A more targeted way to investigate a specific CPA is to use the Temporal Controllers’ fixed temporal range mode to jump to a specific time frame. This is helpful if we already know the time frame we are interested in. For the CPA use case, this means that we can look up the timestamp of a nearby AIS position and set up the Temporal Controller accordingly:

More

I hope you enjoyed this quick dive into MobilityDB. For more details, including talks by the project founders, check out the project website.


This post is part of a series. Read more about movement data in GIS.

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