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spatio-temporal data

TimeManager turns 10 this year. The code base has made the transition from QGIS 1.x to 2.x and now 3.x and it would be wrong to say that it doesn’t show ;-)

Now, it looks like the days of TimeManager are numbered. Four days ago, Nyall Dawson has added native temporal support for vector layers to QGIS. This is part of a larger effort of adding time support for rasters, meshes, and now also vectors.

The new Temporal Controller panel looks similar to TimeManager. Layers are configured through the new Temporal tab in Layer Properties. The temporal dimension can be used in expressions to create fancy time-dependent styles:

temporal1

TimeManager Geolife demo converted to Temporal Controller (click for full resolution)

Obviously, this feature is brand new and will require polishing. Known issues listed by Nyall include limitations of supported time fields (only fields with datetime type are supported right now, strings cannot be used) and worse performance than TimeManager since features are filtered in QGIS rather than in the backend.

If you want to give the new Temporal Controller a try, you need to install the current development version, e.g. qgis-dev in OSGeo4W.


Update from May 16:

Many of the limitations above have already been addressed.

Last night, Nyall has recorded a one hour tutorial on this new feature, enjoy:

This post introduces Holoviz Panel, a library that makes it possible to create really quick dashboards in notebook environments as well as more sophisticated custom interactive web apps and dashboards.

The following example shows how to use Panel to explore a dataset (a trajectory collection in this case) and different parameter settings (relating to trajectory generalization). All the Panel code we need is a dict that defines the parameters that we want to explore. Then we can use Panel’s interact function to automatically generate a dashboard for our custom plotting function:

import panel as pn

kw = dict(traj_id=(1, len(traj_collection)), 
          tolerance=(10, 100, 10), 
          generalizer=['douglas-peucker', 'min-distance'])
pn.interact(plot_generalized, **kw)

Click to view the resulting dashboard in full resolution:

The plotting function uses the parameters to generate a Holoviews plot. First it fetches a specific trajectory from the trajectory collection. Then it generalizes the trajectory using the specified parameter settings. As you can see, we can easily combine maps and other plots to visualize different aspects of the data:

def plot_generalized(traj_id=1, tolerance=10, generalizer='douglas-peucker'):
  my_traj = traj_collection.get_trajectory(traj_id).to_crs(CRS(4088))
  if generalizer=='douglas-peucker':
    generalized = mpd.DouglasPeuckerGeneralizer(my_traj).generalize(tolerance)
  else:
    generalized = mpd.MinDistanceGeneralizer(my_traj).generalize(tolerance)
  generalized.add_speed(overwrite=True)
  return ( 
    generalized.hvplot(
      title='Trajectory {} (tolerance={})'.format(my_traj.id, tolerance), 
      c='speed', cmap='Viridis', colorbar=True, clim=(0,20), 
      line_width=10, width=500, height=500) + 
    generalized.df['speed'].hvplot.hist(
      title='Speed histogram', width=300, height=500) 
    )

Trajectory collections and generalization functions used in this example are part of the MovingPandas library. If you are interested in movement data analysis, you should check it out! You can find this example notebook in the MovingPandas tutorial section.

We recently published a new paper on “Open Geospatial Tools for Movement Data Exploration” (open access). If you liked Movement data in GIS #26: towards a template for exploring movement data, you will find even more information about the context, challenges, and recent developments in this paper.

It also presents three open source stacks for movement data exploration:

  1. QGIS + PostGIS: a combination that will be familiar to most open source GIS users
  2. Jupyter + MovingPandas: less common so far, but Jupyter notebooks are quickly gaining popularity (even in the proprietary GIS world)
  3. GeoMesa + Spark: for when datasets become too big to handle using other means

and discusses their capabilities and limitations:


This post is part of a series. Read more about movement data in GIS.

In December, I wrote about GeoPandas on Databricks. Back then, I also tried to get MovingPandas working but without luck. (While GeoPandas can be installed using Databricks’ dbutils.library.installPyPI("geopandas") this PyPI install just didn’t want to work for MovingPandas.)

Now that MovingPandas is available from conda-forge, I gave it another try and … *spoiler alert* … it works!

First of all, conda support on Databricks is in beta. It’s not included in the default runtimes. At the time of writing this post, “6.0 Conda Beta” is the latest runtime with conda:

Once the cluster is up and connected to the notebook, a quick conda list shows the installed packages:

Time to install MovingPandas! I went with a 100% conda-forge installation. This takes a looong time (almost half an hour)!

When the installs are finally done, it get’s serious: time to test the imports!

Success!

Now we can put the MovingPandas data structures to good use. But first we need to load some movement data:

Or course, the points in this GeoDataFrame can be plotted. However, the plot isn’t automatically displayed once plot() is called on the GeoDataFrame. Instead, Databricks provides a display() function to display Matplotlib figures:

MovingPandas also uses Matplotlib. Therefore we can use the same approach to plot the TrajectoryCollection that can be created from the GeoDataFrame:

These Matplotlib plots are nice and quick but they lack interactivity and therefore are of limited use for data exploration.

MovingPandas provides interactive plotting (including base maps) using hvplot. hvplot is based on Bokeh and, luckily, the Databricks documentation tells us that bokeh plots can be exported to html and then displayed using  displayHTML():

Of course, we could achieve all this on MyBinder as well (and much more quickly). However, Databricks gets interesting once we can add (Py)Spark and distributed processing to the mix. For example, “Getting started with PySpark & GeoPandas on Databricks” shows a spatial join function that adds polygon information to a point GeoDataFrame.

A potential use case for MovingPandas would be to speed up flow map computations. The recently added aggregator functionality (currently in master only) first computes clusters of significant trajectory points and then aggregates the trajectories into flows between these clusters. Matching trajectory points to the closest cluster could be a potential use case for distributed computing. Each trajectory (or each point) can be handled independently, only the cluster locations have to be broadcast to all workers.

Flow map (screenshot from MovingPandas tutorial 4_generalization_and_aggregation.ipynb)

 

This post is a follow-up to the draft template for exploring movement data I wrote about in my previous post. Specifically, I want to address step 4: Exploring patterns in trajectory and event data.

The patterns I want to explore in this post are clusters of trip origins. The case study presented here is an extension of the MovingPandas ship data analysis notebook.

The analysis consists of 4 steps:

  1. Splitting continuous GPS tracks into individual trips
  2. Extracting trip origins (start locations)
  3. Clustering trip origins
  4. Exploring clusters

Since I have already removed AIS records with a speed over ground (SOG) value of zero from the dataset, we can use the split_by_observation_gap() function to split the continuous observations into individual trips. Trips that are shorter than 100 meters are automatically discarded as irrelevant clutter:

traj_collection.min_length = 100
trips = traj_collection.split_by_observation_gap(timedelta(minutes=5))

The split operation results in 302 individual trips:

Passenger vessel trajectories are blue, high-speed craft green, tankers red, and cargo vessels orange. Other vessel trajectories are gray.

To extract trip origins, we can use the get_start_locations() function. The list of column names defines which columns are carried over from the trajectory’s GeoDataFrame to the origins GeoDataFrame:

 
origins = trips.get_start_locations(['SOG', 'ShipType']) 

The following density-based clustering step is based on a blog post by Geoff Boeing and uses scikit-learn’s DBSCAN implementation:

from sklearn.cluster import DBSCAN
from geopy.distance import great_circle
from shapely.geometry import MultiPoint

origins['lat'] = origins.geometry.y
origins['lon'] = origins.geometry.x
matrix = origins.as_matrix(columns=['lat', 'lon'])

kms_per_radian = 6371.0088
epsilon = 0.1 / kms_per_radian

db = DBSCAN(eps=epsilon, min_samples=1, algorithm='ball_tree', metric='haversine').fit(np.radians(matrix))
cluster_labels = db.labels_
num_clusters = len(set(cluster_labels))
clusters = pd.Series([matrix[cluster_labels == n] for n in range(num_clusters)])
print('Number of clusters: {}'.format(num_clusters))

Resulting in 69 clusters.

Finally, we can add the cluster labels to the origins GeoDataFrame and plot the result:

origins['cluster'] = cluster_labels

To analyze the clusters, we can compute summary statistics of the trip origins assigned to each cluster. For example, we compute a representative (center-most) point, count the number of trips, and compute the mean speed (SOG) value:

 
def get_centermost_point(cluster):
    centroid = (MultiPoint(cluster).centroid.x, MultiPoint(cluster).centroid.y)
    centermost_point = min(cluster, key=lambda point: great_circle(point, centroid).m)
    return Point(tuple(centermost_point)[1], tuple(centermost_point)[0])
centermost_points = clusters.map(get_centermost_point) 

The largest cluster with a low mean speed (indicating a docking or anchoring location) is cluster 29 which contains 43 trips from passenger vessels, high-speed craft, an an undefined vessel:

To explore the overall cluster pattern, we can plot the clusters colored by speed and scaled by the number of trips:

Besides cluster 29, this visualization reveals multiple smaller origin clusters with low speeds that indicate different docking locations in the analysis area.

Cluster locations with high speeds on the other hand indicate locations where vessels enter the analysis area. In a next step, it might be interesting to compute flows between clusters to gain insights about connections and travel times.

It’s worth noting that AIS data contains additional information, such as vessel status, that could be used to extract docking or anchoring locations. However, the workflow presented here is more generally applicable to any movement data tracks that can be split into meaningful trips.

For the full interactive ship data analysis tutorial visit https://mybinder.org/v2/gh/anitagraser/movingpandas/binder-tag


This post is part of a series. Read more about movement data in GIS.

Yesterday, I learned about a cool use case in data-driven agriculture that requires dealing with delayed measurements. As Bert mentions, for example, potatoes end up in the machines and are counted a few seconds after they’re actually taken out of the ground:

Therefore, in order to accurately map yield, we need to take this temporal offset into account.

We need to make sure that time and location stay untouched, but need to shift the potato count value. To support this use case, I’ve implemented apply_offset_seconds() for trajectories in movingpandas:

    def apply_offset_seconds(self, column, offset):
        self.df[column] = self.df[column].shift(offset, freq='1s')

The following test illustrates its use: you can see how the value column is shifted by 120 second. Geometry and time remain unchanged but the value column is shifted accordingly. In this test, we look at the row with index 2 which we access using iloc[2]:

    def test_offset_seconds(self):
        df = pd.DataFrame([
            {'geometry': Point(0, 0), 't': datetime(2018, 1, 1, 12, 0, 0), 'value': 1},
            {'geometry': Point(-6, 10), 't': datetime(2018, 1, 1, 12, 1, 0), 'value': 2},
            {'geometry': Point(6, 6), 't': datetime(2018, 1, 1, 12, 2, 0), 'value': 3},
            {'geometry': Point(6, 12), 't': datetime(2018, 1, 1, 12, 3, 0), 'value':4},
            {'geometry': Point(6, 18), 't': datetime(2018, 1, 1, 12, 4, 0), 'value':5}
        ]).set_index('t')
        geo_df = GeoDataFrame(df, crs={'init': '31256'})
        traj = Trajectory(1, geo_df)
        traj.apply_offset_seconds('value', -120)
        self.assertEqual(traj.df.iloc[2].value, 5)
        self.assertEqual(traj.df.iloc[2].geometry, Point(6, 6))

Many current movement data sources provide more or less continuous streams of object locations. For example, the AIS system provides continuous locations of vessels (mostly ships). This continuous stream of locations – let’s call it track – starts when we first record the vessel and ends with the last record. This start and end does not necessarily coincide with the start or end of a vessel voyage from one port to another. The stream start and end do not have any particular meaning. Instead, if we want to see what’s going on, we need to split the track into meaningful segments. One such segmentation – albeit a simple one – is to split tracks by day. This segmentation assumes that day/night changes affect the movement of our observed object. For many types of objects – those who mostly stay still during the night – this will work reasonably well.

For example, the following screenshot shows raw data of one particular vessel in the Boston region. By default, QGIS provides a Points to Path to convert points to lines. This tool takes one “group by” and one “order by” field. Therefore, if we want one trajectory per ship per day, we’d first have to create a new field that combines ship ID and day so that we can use this combination as a “group by” field. Additionally, the resulting lines loose all temporal information.

To simplify this workflow, Trajectools now provides a new algorithm that creates day trajectories and outputs LinestringM features. Using the Day trajectories from point layer tool, we can immediately see that our vessel of interest has been active for three consecutive days: entering our observation area on Nov 5th, moving to Boston where it stayed over night, then moving south to Weymouth on the next day, and leaving on the 7th.

Since the resulting trajectories are LinestringM features with time information stored in the M value, we can also visualize the speed of movement (as discussed in part #2 of this series):

TimeManager 2.5 is quite likely going to be the final TimeManager release for the QGIS 2 series. It comes with a couple of bug fixes and enhancements:

  • Fixed #245: updated help.htm
  • Fixed #240: now hiding unmanageable WFS layers
  • Fixed #220: fixed issues with label size
  • Fixed #194: now exposing additional functions: animation_time_frame_size, animation_time_frame_type, animation_start_datetime, animation_end_datetime

Besides updating the help, I also decided to display it more prominently in the settings dialog (similarly to how the help is displayed in the field calculator or in Processing):

So far, I haven’t started porting to QGIS 3 yet. If you are interested in TimeManager and want to help, please get in touch.

On this note, let me leave you with a couple of animation inspirations from the Twitterverse:

Today’s post is a follow-up of Movement data in GIS #3: visualizing massive trajectory datasets. In that post, I summarized a concept for trajectory generalization. Now, I have published the scripts and sample data in my QGIS-Processing-tools repository on Github.

To add the trajectory generalization scripts to your Processing toolbox, you can use the Add scripts from files tool:

It is worth noting, that Add scripts from files fails to correctly import potential help files for the scripts but that’s not an issue this time around, since I haven’t gotten around to actually write help files yet.

The scripts are used in the following order:

  1. Extract characteristic trajectory points
  2. Group points in space
  3. Compute flows between cells from trajectories

The sample project contains input data, as well as output layers of the individual tools. The only required input is a layer of trajectories, where trajectories have to be LINESTRINGM (note the M!) features:

Trajectory sample based on data provided by the GeoLife project

In Extract characteristic trajectory points, distance parameters are specified in meters, stop duration in seconds, and angles in degrees. The characteristic points contain start and end locations, as well as turns and stop locations:

The characteristic points are then clustered. In this tool, the distance has to be specified in layer units, which are degrees in case of the sample data.

Finally, we can compute flows between cells defined by these clusters:

Flow lines scaled by flow strength and cell centers scaled by counts

If you use these tools on your own data, I’d be happy so see what you come up with!


This post is part of a series. Read more about movement data in GIS.

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