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Movement data in GIS #12: why you should be using PostGIS trajectories

In short: both writing trajectory queries as well as executing them is considerably faster using PostGIS trajectories (as LinestringM) rather than the commonly used point-based approach.

Here are a couple of examples to give you an impression of the differences.

Spoiler alert! Trajectory queries are up to 500 times faster than comparable point-based queries.

A quick look at indexing

In both cases, we have indexed the tracker id, geometry, and time columns to speed up query processing.

The trajectory table has 3 indexes

  • gist (time_range)
  • gist (track gist_geometry_ops_nd)
  • btree (tracker)

The point-based table has 4 indexes

  • gist (pt)
  • btree (trajectory_id)
  • btree (tracker)
  • btree (t)

Length

First, let’s see how to determine trajectory length for all observed moving objects (identified by a tracker id).

Using the point-based approach, we first need to ensure that the points are in the correct temporal order, create the lines, and finally sum up their length:

WITH ordered AS (
 SELECT trajectory_id, tracker, t, pt
 FROM geolife.trajectory_pt
 ORDER BY t
), tmp AS (
 SELECT trajectory_id, tracker, st_makeline(pt) traj
 FROM ordered 
 GROUP BY trajectory_id, tracker
)
SELECT tracker, round(sum(ST_Length(traj::geography)))
FROM tmp
GROUP BY tracker 
ORDER BY tracker

With trajectories, we can go right to computing lengths:

SELECT tracker, round(sum(ST_Length(track::geography)))
FROM geolife.trajectory_ext
GROUP BY tracker
ORDER BY tracker

On my test system, the trajectory query run time is 22.7 sec instead of 43.0 sec for the point-based approach:

Duration

Compared to trajectory length, duration is less complicated in the point-based approach:

WITH tmp AS (
 SELECT trajectory_id, tracker, min(t) start_time, max(t) end_time
 FROM geolife.trajectory_pt
 GROUP BY trajectory_id, tracker
)
SELECT tracker, sum(end_time - start_time)
FROM tmp
GROUP BY tracker
ORDER BY tracker

Still, the trajectory query is less complex and much faster at 31 ms instead of 6.0 sec:

SELECT tracker, sum(upper(time_range) - lower(time_range))
FROM geolife.trajectory_ext
GROUP BY tracker
ORDER BY tracker

Temporal filter

Extracting trajectories that occurred during a certain time frame is another common use case:

WITH tmp AS (
 SELECT trajectory_id, tracker, min(t) start_time, max(t) end_time
 FROM geolife.trajectory_pt
 GROUP BY trajectory_id, tracker
)
SELECT trajectory_id, tracker, start_time, end_time
FROM tmp
WHERE end_time > '2008-11-26 11:00'
AND start_time < '2008-11-26 15:00'
ORDER BY tracker

This point-based query takes 6.0 sec while the shorter trajectory query finishes in 12 ms:

SELECT id, tracker, time_range
FROM geolife.trajectory_ext
WHERE time_range && '[2008-11-26 11:00+1,2008-11-26 15:00+01]'::tstzrange

or equally fast (12 ms) by making use of the n-dimensional index:

WHERE track &&&	ST_Collect(
 ST_MakePointM(-180, -90, extract(epoch from '2008-11-26 11:00'::timestamptz)),
 ST_MakePointM(180, 90, extract(epoch from '2008-11-26 15:00'::timestamptz))
)

Spatial filter

Finally, of course, let’s have a look at spatial filters, for example, trajectories that start in a certain area:

WITH my AS ( 
 SELECT ST_Buffer(ST_SetSRID(ST_MakePoint(116.31894,39.97472),4326),0.0005) areaA
), tmp AS (
 SELECT trajectory_id, tracker, min(t) t 
 FROM geolife.trajectory_pt
 GROUP BY trajectory_id, tracker
)
SELECT distinct traj.tracker, traj.trajectory_id 
FROM tmp
JOIN geolife.trajectory_pt traj
ON tmp.trajectory_id = traj.trajectory_id AND traj.t = tmp.t
JOIN my
ON ST_Within(traj.pt, my.areaA)

This point-based query takes 6.0 sec while the shorter trajectory query finishes in 488 ms:

WITH my AS ( 
 SELECT ST_Buffer(ST_SetSRID(ST_MakePoint(116.31894, 39.97472),4326),0.0005) areaA
)
SELECT id, tracker, ST_AsText(track)
FROM geolife.trajectory_ext
JOIN my
ON areaA && track
AND ST_Within(ST_StartPoint(track), areaA)

For more generic “does this trajectory intersect another geometry”, the points can also be aggregated to a linestring on the fly but that takes 21.9 sec:

I’ll be presenting more work on PostGIS trajectories at GI_Forum in Salzburg in July. In the talk, I’ll also have a look at the custom PG-Trajectory datatype. Here’s the full open-access paper:

Graser, A. (2018) Evaluating Spatio-temporal Data Models for Trajectories in PostGIS Databases. GI_Forum ‒ Journal of Geographic Information Science, 1-2018, 16-33. DOI: 10.1553/giscience2018_01_s16.

You can find my fork of the PG-Trajectory project – including all necessary fixes – on Bitbucket.


This post is part of a series. Read more about movement data in GIS.

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2 comments
  1. Christos Charmatzis said:

    What indexes did you create for these queries?

    • The trajectory table has 3 indexes:
      – gist (time_range);
      – gist (track gist_geometry_ops_nd);
      – btree (tracker);

      The point-based table has 4 indexes
      – gist (pt);
      – btree (trajectory_id);
      – btree (tracker);
      – btree (t);

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